Since 2007, the Ballydehob Jazz Festival has grown in stature and standard to become a multidisciplinary festival of music ,dance and street spectacle with a major focus on arts participation in the community. This year the festival is excited to commission Cork artist Anthony Ruby (www.anthonyrubyartist.com), to create a mural in the heart of the village. The public mural will be unveiled in time for the Ballydehob Jazz Festival Weekend 2021 and acessible to all.

Anthony Ruby

Anthony Ruby is a renowned visual artist. He studied Fine Arts at Crawford College of Art and Design Shortlisted for the prestigious ‘Threadneedle Prize’, his works hang in various collections. His commission for Cork City Council – the 90ft long ‘Pana Shuffle’ on Mutton Lane – has become one of Cork City’s most iconic cultural landmarks.

He has won numerous awards and his work, influenced by Otto Dix, Max Beckmann, Diego Rivera, Goya, and José Clemente Orozco, have sold to private and public collectors such as University College Cork and Cork Institute of Technology.

Anthony Ruby is a member of the music group ‘The Diviners’

An Uillean Piper, whistle player, vocalist, songwriter and tunesmith

Review of Foghorns and False Beacons’

“Anthony Ruby’s work references eccentric or obsolete forms of technology to communicate a sense of unease and dislocation. His canvases are populated by figures whose faces are obscured by beams of light, by cyborgs and bizarre contraptions, by strange fusions of birds and dogs and skeletal horses. His painterly language, alternating between fogs of turps spatter and hyper smooth glazes, recalls the smeared perfection of a grease smudged phone screen.

Ruby’s calculatedly eccentric iconography however, more steam punk than Silicon Valley, reminds us that these feelings of alienation and anxiety are not new, but are phenomena that date back to the industrial revolution when even Karl Marx warned that dual nature of technology was ‘a demonic force that reduces humans to the conscious limbs of the automaton’. (Karl Marx, 1893)”.

Sarah Kelleher 2019